Eigenfunction, Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors

Eigenfunction and Eigenvalues → If $\psi$ is a well-behaved function, then an operator $\hat{P}$ may operate on $\psi$ in two different ways depending upon the nature of function $\psi$ `
  1. When an operator $\hat{P}$ operates on any function $\psi$ then this function $\psi$ changes into another function $\phi$. i.e.

    $\hat{P} \psi =\phi$

    Where $\phi$ is a new function linearly depending upon the initial function $\psi$.

    Example:

    Let us consider a function $f(x)=x^{2}$ and an operator ie. differential operator $\frac{d}{dx}$ is operate on the function. Then we get

    $\frac{d}{dx}f(x)= \frac{d}{dx} (x^{2})$

    $\frac{d}{dx}f(x)= 2x$

    Now the given function $f(x)=x^{2}$ change into another function $f(x)=x$.

  2. When an operator $\hat{P}$ operates on any function $\psi$ then this function $\psi$ does not change into another function but now this function $\psi$ may be with multiples of complex or real numbers(or values).i.e

    $\hat{P} \psi =\lambda \phi$

    Where $\lambda$ is Real OR Complex Number. This number or value is known as Eigenvalues.

    In this case, the function $\psi$ is a member of the class of physically meaningful functions called the eigen function of the operator $\hat{P}$. The number $\lambda$ is called the eigen value of operator $\hat{P}$ associated with eigen function $\psi$ and this equation is known as the eigenvalue equation.

    Example: Let us consider a function $f(x)=e^{2x}$ and an operator ie. differential operator $\frac{d}{dx}$ is operate on the function. Then we get

    $\frac{d}{dx}f(x)= \frac{d}{dx} (e^{2x})$

    $\frac{d}{dx}f(x)= 2e^{2x}$

    Now the given function $f(x)=e^{2x}$ change into another function $f(x)=x$.


Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors →

Let a linear transformation equation

$AX=\lambda X \qquad(1)$

Where
A → Square matrix of $n$ order (where $n=1,2,3,.....$)
$\lambda$ → Scalar Factor

The equation $(1)$ may be written as

$AX=I\lambda X$

$AX-I\lambda X=0$

$(A-I\lambda)X=0 \qquad(2)$

Where $I$ is unit matrix

Any value of $\lambda$ for which equation $(1)$ or equation $(2)$ has non zero (i.e $X \neq 0$) solution is called eigenvalues or characteristic roots or latent root of the matrix $A$ and corresponding non zero solution of $X$ is called eigenvectors or characteristic vectors or latent vectors of the matrix $A$

The matrix $\left| A- \lambda I \right|$ is called characteristic matrix of $A$. The determinant $\phi(\lambda) = \left| A- \lambda I \right|$ is called the characteristic polynomial of $A$. So

$\phi(\lambda) = \left| A- \lambda I \right| =0$

And $\phi(x)= a_{0}+a_{1} \lambda a_{2} \lambda^{2}+ .......+a_{n} \lambda^{n}=0 $

Comments