Energy distribution spectrum of black body radiation

Description→ The energy distribution among the different wavelengths in the spectrum of black body radiation was studied by Lummer and Pringsheim in 1899. There are the following important observations of the study.
  1. The energy distribution in the radiation spectrum of the black body is not uniform. As the temperature of the body rises the intensity of radiation for each wavelength increases.

  2. At a given temperature, the intensity of radiation increases with increases in wavelength and becomes maximum at a particular wavelength with further in increases wavelength the intensity of radiation decreases.

  3. Energy distribution in the spectrum of black body
    Energy distribution in the spectrum of black body radiation
  4. The points of maximum energy shift towards the shorter wavelength as the temperature increases i.e. $\lambda _{m} \times T=constant$. It is also known as Wein’s displacement law of energy distribution.

  5. For a given temperature the total energy of radiation is represented by the area between the curve and the horizontal axis and the area increases with increases of temperature, being directly proportional to the fourth power of absolute temperatures.
    The total amount of heat radiated by a perfectly black body per unit area per unit time is directly proportional to the fourth power of its absolute temperature $(T)$.

    $E = \sigma T^{4}$

    Where $\sigma$ = Stefan constant having value $\left ({5}\cdot{67}\times{10}^{-8}Wm^{-2}K^{4}\right )$

    This is called Stefan-Boltzmann's law of energy distribution.